Darren Rovell Says Nike is Not Meeting Demand for Retro Dream Team Apparel

Sports business analyst Darren Rovell, who recently left CNBC for ESPN, joined Colin Cowherd’s radio show today to talk about the US Men’s Olympic Basketball team, Jeremy Lin, and Carmelo Anthony.

At the beginning, Cowherd asked Rovell to compare the marketability of the 1992 Dream Team to this year’s squad:

Cowherd: We all acknowledge that the Dream Team was better on the court [than this year’s team]. Is this team comparable to the Dream Team in marketing? Was that team far more popular than this team?

Rovell: If you break it down, it’s obviously a different era in time but, yeah, I would definitely say that this team is not as marketable as that team. But, then again, sports marketing has come a long way…I think that the Dream Team as a marketing vehicle–it’s not even close. And the crazy thing is, by the way, everyone’s asking Nike, “Where are all the retro Dream Team things that I want to buy?”

I think it’s one of the first times ever where Nike has not met demand for something.

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Barack and Michelle Obama on Kiss Cam at USA-Brazil

President Obama attended tonight’s USA-Brazil exhibition tonight with his wife, Michelle, and got put on Kiss Cam:

Ultimately, Michelle seemed put off by the idea and the crowd didn’t really pressure them enough to do it.

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Why Team USA Basketball Should Consider Greg Stiemsma (Seriously)

Let me preface this column by saying that as a fellow Wisconsin Badger I am absolutely biased on the subject. I hadn’t thought much about Stiemsma for three years but was delighted when he surfaced in Boston this year, had six blocks in his debut, and got compared to Bill Russell by the inimitable Celtics homer announcer Tommy Heinsohn after playing just five games.

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Ugh, the Spurs are Gonna Win, Aren’t They?

by Asif Attarwala

This year’s NBA Playoffs have been great. We’ve seen a number one seed go down in the first round (Bulls), the Lakers implode (always fun), the rebirth of one of the sport’s greatest rivalries (Celtics – Sixers), the birth of what could be the league’s next dynasty — or next late 90s/ early 00s Sacramento Kings — (Oklahoma City), and the sport’s best player taking his game to the next level (LeBron). That’s why it’s such a shame that these playoffs are going to end in the least compelling way possible: a championship for the San Antonio Spurs, the blandest, least dominant “dominant” team in NBA history. Think about it, every other possible outcome is way more exciting than the Spur’s winning. If the Heat win, it’s LeBron’s coronation, he’ll cement his legacy, and Skip Bayless will have one less talking point. If the Thunder win, it’s the birth of a potential dynasty and Kevin Durant potentially surpasses LeBron as the game’s best player (Kobe remains in the conversation). If the Celtics win it’s a last hurrah for three Hall of Famers, who rejuvenated the Association’s most storied franchise, plus riot potential. The Spurs? Another championship for a consistent, but boring team that never won two in a row and would have been stomped by any of the teams that won the title between theirs. No one wants to see that. Unfortunately, it’s inevitable.

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Lin, Lin, Lin No Matter What

Like a Republican presidential candidate rocketing to the top of the polls, New York Knicks point guard Jeremy Lin has come out of absolutely nowhere to captivate the national consciousness this past week. Lin–the son of Taiwanese immigrants and a 2010 Harvard graduate–went undrafted, played in just 29 games and 285 minutes last season for the Golden State Warriors, was released twice before the start of this season–by the Warriors and, later, the Houston Rockets–and emerged only due to a string of Knicks injuries.

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