World Wide Wednesday

Deep Routes

An angry millenial writes an open letter to her parents’ generation that makes a whole lot of sense:

Quit telling us we’re not special.

Believe us, we bloody well know.

Earlier this month, Wellesley high school teacher David McCullough, Jr., delivered what was perhaps the world’s first commencement dirge to a crowd of teenagers on the first day of distinction many of them have ever experienced. Graduation from high school, he informed them, is a shiny induction to the hordes of mediocrity. McCullough even took it upon himself to remind the youth of their eventual funerals. (You know it’s a problematic speech when Rush Limbaugh loves it.) What parting words did the teacher have for those who survived his twelve-minute lesson on nihilism? The paradoxical exhortation to go forth and live extraordinary lives! Because, apparently, we can?

Here’s the rub: this speech is misplaced. It doesn’t belong in an address to the generation graduating into an economy that wipes its rear end with their high school diplomas. It doesn’t belong in an address to the generation who began running the rat race at age 4. It doesn’t apply to the generation that knows hard work guarantees nothing, that can’t hope to own a home before we have our own children, that pours coffee for other people’s parents for free in the name of gaining “work experience” through “internship.” David McCullough ought to have given that speech not to the graduates, but to their parents. We have not yet begun to shape the world: we are living in the one you created. And it’s killing us.

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World Wide Wednesday

How I saw the Internet this week

Deep Routes

– On Gawker, Drew Magary urges you to stop complaining about Bloomberg’s ban on massive sodas:

If you think that a ban on large sodas is somehow an affront to America freedom, I have news for you: You don’t live in a free country. You never have and you never will. That’s an illusion. You are not free to murder people in America. You are not free to stand in the middle of an intersection and block traffic like an asshole. You do not have the absolute freedom to do anything you want in America, and that’s a good thing, because living somewhere with absolute freedom means you live in fucking Deadwood. There are a million different laws and rules that come with being an American, and we, as a collective, put all those annoying rules in there of our own accord. Democracy doesn’t mean “Hey you, go do whatever the fuck you want.” It means that you get to choose the people that represent you in government, and hope that they create and enforce the laws that help us function as a civilized society.

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World Wide Wednesday

How I saw the Internet this week

Deep Routes

– Wright Thompson profiles Bear Bryant’s driver:

Billy picked him up in the morning. He dropped him off at night. Sometimes they talked. Sometimes they didn’t. Often, Coach read the paper aloud. Once, when a state trooper clocked Varner speeding, Bryant stuck his houndstooth hat in the back window. The patrolman understood and backed off. Billy saw him weak and insecure. He drove him to Birmingham one year before Christmas because Bryant got a letter from a sick girl and he wanted to surprise her. He saw him cry. When Paul took his grandson fishing, Billy came along.

Varner never felt comfortable enough to strike up conversations with Bryant, but he could poke at the Legend of The Bear. Driving through Mississippi one night, they stopped at a catfish house. Bryant bought seafood dinners for everyone there, and Billy cracked later, “It was like you were handing out loaves and fishes.” At the end, when Bryant was sicker than anyone knew, Billy heard the private coughs.

 

– On Grantland, Steve Marsh writes an incredible profile on the process of funding the new Vikings stadium:

It’s an election year, which, strangely, means that this spring was supposed to be a do-nothing legislative session. Everybody — Democrats, Republicans, and tea partiers alike — were supposed to be too nervous to take a stand on anything, anxiously hoping to run out the clock by pointing fingers at each other until November. But when the Vikings stadium bill predictably fell apart in some House committee, Roger Goodell got involved. The commissioner grabbed Art Rooney, everybody’s favorite mascot for surrogate paternal authority, and flew into town to hold a joint press conference with our governor and no. 1 Vikings fan Mark Dayton. They made not very carefully veiled threats about the Vikings becoming a “free agent” if something wasn’t done by the end of this session.

Quick Reads

– Natalie Wolchover seeks to answer a burning question that has been plaguing me since childhood: How much gold would you need to recreate Scrooge McDuck’s gold coin pool?

– The world’s oldest workers (I hope) in the world’s oldest profession: 69-year old twin prostitutes.

– I normally can’t STAND Thought Catalog but this is a very well-done post by Ryan O’Connell: “25 Things I’ve Learned In My 20s.

– Why do people crush Photoshop for digitally altering reality while Instagram gets a pass?

– A urinal that lets you play guitar with your urine.

– On Grantland, Bill Barnwell takes us through the first round of NFL over/under bet props.

– Drew Magary HATES mayo:

I hate mayonnaise. I hate it, and I’ve hated it my entire life. But I can’t seem to escape it. You mayo-haters out there know what I mean. You walk into a restaurant, you order something and say, “but no mayo,” then when it’s delivered to you not only is there mayo on it, there is an OFFENSIVE amount of mayo on it. Every pore in the bread bursts with it. It’s such a horrible thing to experience, because it means that either your server forgot your request to hold the mayo or–and this is far worse–your server IGNORED the request. “What? Hold the mayo? He can’t possibly be serious. Let’s triple the mayo so that he appreciates it fully.”

Food Porn

Strawberry Nutella Waffle @ Waffle Bros (Denver, CO)

Chicken Breast Sandwich with Pesto Mayo @ Panes Bread Cafe (Chicago, IL)

World Wide Wednesday

by Ryan Glasspiegel

Follow Sports Rapport on Twitter!

Deep Routes

– SI’s Lee Jenkins’ brilliant cover profile on LeBron James. This is about as much as we’ve ever seen LeBron open up.

– In The Atlantic, David Samuels profiles Kanye West. While a lot of this piece doesn’t necessarily contain new information, there are also some very interesting insights into Kanye’s inner psyche. It’s a good piece to keep open in a tab for a day or two, reading bits and pieces of in between work and other diversions.

– My friend Brad passed along this great TorrentFreak long read on the history of file-sharing.

Quick Reads

– Clay Travis recommends Houston and Nashville as permanent neutral grounds for BCS semi-finals if College Football ever adopts a 4-team playoff. Travis’ Nashville bias notwithstanding, he makes a pretty good case for both.

– On SI.com, Andy Staples breaks down how the 32 players in Peter King’s mock first round were ranked as recruits coming out of high school: “Fifteen of the 32 players in King’s Mock rated three stars or fewer out of high school, meaning evaluators felt they would, at best, be solid contributors at the FBS level.”

– Continuing on the mock draft front, Yahoo’s Michael Silver draws up his annual NFL mock draft, where he evaluates who would go 1-32 if NFL teams had the opportunity to draft anybody in the league or eligible for this year’s draft. Spoiler alert: A-Rodg goes #1.

– Former Packers salary cap guru Andrew Brandt writes about the Packers’ draft war room.

– NYT bestselling author Justin Halpern writes a satirical guest post for KSK: If Mel Kiper Jr. Broke Down Women at a Bar. Hilarity ensues. (Via Asif)

– Dealbook: Facebook’s First quarter profit falls 12% ahead of expected offering.

90’s clip of the week

This segment has sort of been neglected for the last month or so, but I remembered this awesome song and think that we all need to band together to bring it back! Seriously, you guys.

Food Porn

My friend Adam started a new blog, I Eat Detroit. It’s what it sounds like. Here is a picture of some exquisite-looking rib tips that he ate from Bert’s BBQ, Pizza, and Soul Food:

 

Cheese Curds at Old Town Pour House, a new upscale bar in Chicago that has the best TV set-up I have ever seen in a bar–two 108-inch screens (TVs, not projectors), each surrounded by four ~60-inch screens. I’m pretty sure its construction is a solid indicator that our nation’s economic hardships have come to an end–bars like this don’t get funded and built during recessions.

World Wide Wednesday

How I saw the internet this past week…

Deep Routes

– Steve Hehn writes about the biggest risks of Facebook’s impending IPO for NPR. What happens to the company’s culture when Facebook’s most talented employees–many of whom are in their 20s–are set for life? If I were in their position, I’d probably bounce.

– Grantland unearths David Remnick’s classic New Yorker piece on Michael Jordan’s first basketball comeback. Note to self: learn how to write this beautifully.

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World Wide Wednesday

New weekly feature in which I pull up the best links from my week reading the internet. I’ll also sprinkle in some hot foodporn action and some cool stuff from the Youtubes. If you have anything to contribute in any of these categories going forward, by all means do so. Especially foodporn. Here goes…

Deep Routes 

Gabriel Sherman’s NY Mag cover piece – The Emasculation of Wall Street – gives a very detailed account of where Wall Street compensation is at, how the glory days aren’t returning anytime soon, and analogizes investment banks to big box retailers like Wal-mart, a comparison that would have been unthinkable just a few years back. There’s the usual tone-deaf quotes from bankers and traders but by and large this piece is well-written, informative, and fair and Sherman got some great access for it.

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